Country diary: July light turns the skipper's wings into flakes of gold

Lligwy, Anglesey: The butterfly seeks a moment’s respite from the bullying sea breeze

Aye-aye, skipper. A butterfly – the large skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) – alights near the art installation on the headland commemorating the Royal Charter steam clipper carrying gold miners returning from Australia with their treasure that sank off the coast of Anglesey in the terrible storm of 1859. Seeking a moment’s respite from the bullying sea breeze, the skipper folds its wings at 45 degrees and the fierce July light turns it into flakes of gold.

On the sandy edge of the Irish Sea, history is written by storms and there is no permanence but the anarchy of weather and tide. And yet inland, in gentle hills beyond the campsites, the roofless medieval chapel at Din Lligwy stands before trees that conceal the remains of iron-age roundhouses and smithies, and up the hill behind them is the great stone slab of a Neolithic burial chamber.

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Source: The Guardian
Country diary: July light turns the skipper's wings into flakes of gold